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On patrol with Philippines police accused of killing 7,000





  • Filmmaker Livvy Haydock shadowed exacting drug task forces in Manila  
  • 4,000 killings in the capital city have been carried out by masked vigilantes
  • Populist leader Duerte has won admiration in his country for his stance on drugs  

By Fionn Hargreaves For Mailonline

Published: 17:08 EDT, 20 March 2017 | Updated: 20:17 EDT, 20 March 2017

In the Filipino capital of Manila, the life of a drug dealer is more dangerous than it would be in most other countries. 

After President Rodrigo Duerte promised to 'slaughter' anyone involved with the illegal substances, 7,000 dealers have been killed in the city.

On some nights, as many as 20 are killed on the streets. 

In Manila, the capital of the Philippines, 7,000 drug dealers have been killed in the last eight months. As many as 20 are killed in a night on the streets. Pictured, policemen investigate the death of a woman, who was shot down by an unidentified man In Manila, the capital of the Philippines, 7,000 drug dealers have been killed in the last eight months. As many as 20 are killed in a night on the streets. Pictured, policemen investigate the death of a woman, who was shot down by an unidentified man

In Manila, the capital of the Philippines, 7,000 drug dealers have been killed in the last eight months. As many as 20 are killed in a night on the streets. Pictured, policemen investigate the death of a woman, who was shot down by an unidentified man

Police officers have a list of people who are suspected of being involved in drugs. Pictured, suspects with their hands tied in plastic straps walk past houses during a raid by the Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency Police officers have a list of people who are suspected of being involved in drugs. Pictured, suspects with their hands tied in plastic straps walk past houses during a raid by the Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency

Police officers have a list of people who are suspected of being involved in drugs. Pictured, suspects with their hands tied in plastic straps walk past houses during a raid by the Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency

Filmmaker Livvy Haydock went on patrol with policemen sent to investigate suspected dealers, for a BBC documentary on Duerte's war on drugs.

She saw the dead body of a dealer, whose wallet had been emptied with a note placed inside, which read: 'Sorry I destroyed my life because of drugs, sorry I’m a pusher.'

But not all of the killings have been committed by official police officers. 

Filmmaker Livvy Haydock went on patrol with policemen sent to investigate suspected dealers for a BBC documentary. More than 4,000 suspects have been killed by masked vigilantes Filmmaker Livvy Haydock went on patrol with policemen sent to investigate suspected dealers for a BBC documentary. More than 4,000 suspects have been killed by masked vigilantes

Filmmaker Livvy Haydock went on patrol with policemen sent to investigate suspected dealers for a BBC documentary. More than 4,000 suspects have been killed by masked vigilantes

The summary executions have created a climate of fear around communities involved in drugs. Since the killings began 790,000 people have sworn to never get involved in drugs again. Pictured, a PDEA agent checks the identities of suspects during a raid The summary executions have created a climate of fear around communities involved in drugs. Since the killings began 790,000 people have sworn to never get involved in drugs again. Pictured, a PDEA agent checks the identities of suspects during a raid

The summary executions have created a climate of fear around communities involved in drugs. Since the killings began 790,000 people have sworn to never get involved in drugs again. Pictured, a PDEA agent checks the identities of suspects during a raid

Masked vigilantes have killed more than 4,000 people involved in drugs, after Duerte told people to 'go ahead and kill'.

Ms Haydock spoke to a vigilante who told her he had killed 12 people recently. 

Writing in the Mirror, she said: 'He told me that the police were providing the vigilantes with names of those to be eliminated.' 

Officially, police knock on the doors of suspects who are named on a list.  

They are asked to take a drugs test and if it comes back positive, they are marked on the list.  

The killings have created a climate of fear around drug culture in the country and police are giving targets the choice to surrender or die. 

Since the executions began some 790,000 have sworn never to get involved in drugs. 

Pictured, a police officers shows saches of crystal meth, or 'shabu'. One dealer told Ms Haydock selling drugs was the only way to provide for her family Pictured, a police officers shows saches of crystal meth, or 'shabu'. One dealer told Ms Haydock selling drugs was the only way to provide for her family

Pictured, a police officers shows saches of crystal meth, or 'shabu'. One dealer told Ms Haydock selling drugs was the only way to provide for her family

A dealer told the filmmaker selling crystal meth was the only way she could feed her family.  

But the Ms Haydock also discovered that it wasn't just dealers who were being targeted in the killings. 

Some vigilantes are targeting people they hold grudges against and explain the death away as part of Duerte's war on drugs. 

President Duerte holds an 80 per cent approval rating in the country after he encouraged the public to 'go ahead and kill'. Pictured, a PDEA agent escorts suspects inside a public cemetery President Duerte holds an 80 per cent approval rating in the country after he encouraged the public to 'go ahead and kill'. Pictured, a PDEA agent escorts suspects inside a public cemetery

President Duerte holds an 80 per cent approval rating in the country after he encouraged the public to 'go ahead and kill'. Pictured, a PDEA agent escorts suspects inside a public cemetery

Human rights activists have been trying to investigate how and why the suspects are killed, even though Duerte has threatened their safety for doing so. Pictured, morgue workers carry an unclaimed body and victim of a killing Human rights activists have been trying to investigate how and why the suspects are killed, even though Duerte has threatened their safety for doing so. Pictured, morgue workers carry an unclaimed body and victim of a killing

Human rights activists have been trying to investigate how and why the suspects are killed, even though Duerte has threatened their safety for doing so. Pictured, morgue workers carry an unclaimed body and victim of a killing

One family claimed that their son Yanis, 20, was shot, even though he wasn't involved in drugs.  

President Duerte is often called the Donald Trump of the Phillipines and holds an 80 per cent approval rating in the country. 

When Ms Haydock approched his spokesman and sister Jocelyn, she said: 'If they elected a president like him and that’s the way they want it done, that’s the way it will be done.'

Journalists in the Philippines have taken to patrolling the streets at night in an attempt to find out more about these executions. 

Human Rights activists are also trying to uncover more about the killings, even though Duerte has also threatened their safety for doing so.

Deadliest Place to Deal is available on BBC iPlayer from 10am on Wednesday

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