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Hawaii plans to fight President Trump's revised travel ban





Hawaii plans to fight President Trump's revised travel ban Hawaii plans to fight President Trump's revised travel ban
  • Trump's ban on nationals from six countries goes into effect on March 16
  • Hawaii wants to amend existing lawsuit challenging previous travel ban 
  • Unlike the original ban, the revised order excludes Iraq from list of countries 

A day after President Donald Trump signed a revised travel ban, attorneys for Hawaii said the state plans to challenge that order as well.

The state wants to amend its existing lawsuit challenging Trump's previous order to contest the revised one, according to a motion filed Tuesday in federal court in Honolulu.

The new order bars new visas for people from six Muslim-majority countries and temporarily shuts down America's refugee program, affecting would-be visitors and immigrants from Iran, Syria, Somalia, Sudan, Yemen and Libya.

 Hawaii Attorney General Doug Chin (seen above on February 3, 2017) speaks at a news conference in Honolulu announcing the state of Hawaii has filed a lawsuit challenging President Donald Trump's travel ban

Hawaii Attorney General Doug Chin (seen above on February 3, 2017) speaks at a news conference in Honolulu announcing the state of Hawaii has filed a lawsuit challenging President Donald Trump's travel ban

Hawaii's lawsuit had been on hold while a nationwide injunction on the initial ban remained in place. 

This is the second time Hawaii has asked a judge to lift the stay in order to file an amended lawsuit.

Last month, US District Court Judge Derrick Watson in Honolulu allowed the state to file an amended lawsuit adding the Muslim Association of Hawaii's imam as a plaintiff. 

The mother-in-law of Imam Ismail Elshikh is a Syrian national living in Syria, according to the lawsuit that details the effect the ban would have had on Elshikh's family and others in Hawaii.

According to the motion, attorneys for the government had no position on the request to file another amended lawsuit.

Hawaii plans to file its amended lawsuit and a motion for a temporary restraining order on Wednesday.

Tuesday's motion proposes a hearing on March 15, a day before the revised ban goes into effect.

Attorneys representing Hawaii couldn't immediately be reached for comment. Hawaii has hired a Washington, DC, law firm to help. 

Josh Wisch, a spokesman for the attorney general's office, said last month the firm is giving the state a 50 per cent discount.

'This new executive order is nothing more than Muslim Ban 2.0,' Hawaii Attorney General Doug Chin said in a statement Monday. 

'Under the pretense of national security, it still targets immigrants and refugees. It leaves the door open for even further restrictions.' 

In signing the order on Monday, Trump removed Iraq from the list of countries targeted.

The new order was also worded in an effort to shield it from being struck down by the courts.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson told reporters on Monday that the revised order 'is part of our efforts to eliminate vulnerabilities that radical Islamist terrorists can and will exploit for destructive ends.'

He said it 'will bolster the security of the united states and her allies.'

 In signing the order on Monday, Trump (seen in the Oval Office on Monday) removed Iraq from the list of countries targeted. The new order was also worded in an effort to shield it from being struck down by the courts

In signing the order on Monday, Trump (seen in the Oval Office on Monday) removed Iraq from the list of countries targeted. The new order was also worded in an effort to shield it from being struck down by the courts

The president quietly signed the papers Monday morning out of view of cameras and journalists. 

His action also revokes the first version, signed in late January.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions defended Trump's immigration policies, saying the US Constitution gives him the power 'to make national security judgments and to enforce our immigration policies in order to safeguard the American public.'

Sessions said 'this executive order is a proper exercise of that power.'

Trump's chief counselor Kellyanne Conway said on 'Fox & Friends' that the new order 'has an effective date of March 16th' – despite Trump's repeated insistence that the measure is a response to urgent national security threats.  


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